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KQED (PBS) 47
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mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are
're already important for us. because many conflicts are around us. so therefore our attempt, our word and our insistence to contribute to the solution of the problems is appreciated. >> couric: and the prime minister of the palestinian authority, salam fayyad. >> it's one that's based definitely on dealing violence out of the equation for sure. that's our interest. that's how we defined it. from our point of view. it happens to be consistent with obligations that we took on the road map and going back to 1993. it's in our best interest, we're not doing no one else a favor but ourselves when we subscribe to nonviolence. as a really key component to what we have to do to get to freedom. >> couric: a program note: our interview with the c.e.o. of google, eric schmidt, will be seen at a later date. tonight, the president of turkey and the prime minister of the palestinian authority when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: abdullah gul is here, he's the president of turkey, a key u.s. ally and nato member, turke
is not very solid. it's about $30 sml a years which which is peanuts compared to what the u.s. has with china, with the european union. but the potential is huge. >> rose: and we conclude with one of the most interesting entrepreneurs in all of china, he is jack ma. his company is alled alibaba. >> core competence of our companies, we have 20,000, grow from 18 people, now 20,000 people. and we focus a lot on the making sure the culture, everybody works for helping others instead of just making money. and we believe different from wall street, we believe customer number one, employee two, shareholder three. >> rose: customer one, employee, two, shareholder three? >> yes, again, this is my religion. >> rose: russia and the world, china and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama came to office promising to reset relations with russia. he and russian president dmitry medvedev appeared to form a personal bond. they have since signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty-- now waiting to be
and reward system involves several different brain regions that communicate using chemical signals called neurotransmitters. the this circuit helps us to repeat the behaviors that make us happy while avoiding those that make us miserable. but as any adult knows, pleasure is not always good for you. tonight we'll also explore particularly dangerous forms of pleasure-seeking, addiction. long considered to be a moral weakness, addiction is now understood to be a biological disease. finally, we will explore the role that emotions play in decision-making and social interaction. next month, in part two of the emotional brain, we will turn our focus to negative emotions such as fear and anxiety. joining us tonight, a group of scientists who have devoted their lives to understanding the emotional brain. daniel salzman, he studies how the brain assigns an emotional value to the information that it receives from the five senses. he is an assistant professor of sky tri and neuroscience at columbia university. wolfram schultz. he studies how the brain's reward systems affect decision-making and learn
is important and facebook is a consequence and very impressive company. and social information will be used by google and by others, i should add, to make the quality of the results, the quality of the experience that much better. the pore we foe about what your friends do with your permission, and i need to say that about 500 times, we can actually use that to improve the experience you have of getting information that you care about. in our case what we're actually do something building social information into all of our products. so it won't be a social network the way people think of facebook but rather social information about who your friends are, people that you interact with. and we have various ways in which we will be collecting that information. >> we continue with the film wall street money never sleeps with the director all i ver stone and two of the jars, josh brolin and shia labeouf. >> the 2 o 008 market is more difficult to understand with credit default swaps and insurance and all that stuff. but we made it a background. that's the way we treated it. we treated the crisis,
tasks smoothly and easily. it allows us to move and to speak and to interact with our surroundings, requiring only minimal amount of effort. but when the brain is damaged, its true complex sit revealed. our subject this evening is the neurological disorders. these include parkinson's disease. stroke. huntington's disease and spinal chord injury. these conditions have taught us more about our brain than any other kind of brain disease. through parkinson's we have learned about movement. through stroke we have learned about speech. and through spinal cord injuries we have learned how thoughts give rise to actions. neurological diseases have been a topic of research for sent yees but-- century bus only recently have we developed effective treatments. this evening we will meet a group of scientists who have developed ways to repair or bypass the disordered brain. john done o hew. his work allowed paralyzed patients to move and communicate using only their thoughts and a machine called a brain computer interface. he is a professor at brown university and co-founder of a company called c
>> rose: welcome to our program. tonight, stephanie d'alessandro and john elderfield take us on a tour of a new matisse exhibit at the museum of modern art. >> it's a period when matisse really seemed to have very intently stopped the kind of work he was doing before and began searching for something and we can chart him through the evolution of "bathers by a river" in fact and then i think through "the exhibition" trying different modes of painting. bringing together different styles, avant-garde styles of the time, ways of making the surface of works very different and reworked. and we watch him not sure where he's going but excited about the possibility of a new kind of art for himself and we feel that for matisse that was a kind of radical invention. he said about "bathers by a river" and "moroccans" that they were two of the most pivotal works of his career. i think it's important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical invention is about. >> i
in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
and in congress is if you propose something that's bold, that touches these third rails, the other side will use it as a political weapon against you so don't dare try. we have to get off, if we court start tackling the fiscal problem, it will tack ale lot. what i do the point i'm trying to make is we do this now and get our prosperity agenda. what i mean when i say this is my plan says nothing changes for anybody 35 and above. -- 55 and above, so if you are 10 years away from retiring we can guarantee your benefit, if you are 54 and below you know the programs won't be the samement you know that the social insurance safety net system we have is imploding. we need to reform it to fix it. i use a few values and principals on how i fix those things am i go kif-- i can give you details if you like. the point i make is do it now, preema debt crisis, if he kick the can down the road it will be austerity to everybody. tax increases to current workers that is the pain plan we should avoid that. >> rose: i meant by dismantle, just dismantle in the traditional way that it works. in other words, you can u
writes the autobiography of our species. >> rose: right. >> so we are used to the story and we tell the story about the way we live. we train kid dpos to go to college. we train them in reasoning skills am we give them technical skills we have a series of strategies that people learn when they go into management. how to network, how to make decisions. and that is the story of human life told from the conscious level. but the revolution of consciousness tells us that below that level there's a more important and more fundamental level and more powerful and in some ways smarter level. and so my book is a description of life and the lives of two people told from that, of that underlevel. >> rose: the lives of two people. >> yeah, i make up characters. i have fictional characters just so exempt few. >> rose: but tell us about what you have found out about the unconscious mind. >> a couple things are important. the first is that we're shaped in so many ways by these unconscious decisions. in trivial ways, i mention by a study by a guy in buffalo that people named dennis are disproportion
, it's going to make us stronger, as if he operates in a parallel universe that bears no relation to reality. >> charlie: as you suggested to me earlier, you have never seen a head of state that you think is prepared to say more untruths? >> i have never in my life seen a head of state look an interviewer in the eye -- look the camera straightforward and lie about something he knows the international community has been filled about the stories -- the story of the stoning. he said, "no one has been accused -- condemned to stoning in iran." for three weeks, that was the top of the news inside and iran and outside iran. he looked into the camera and he said, "i am the head of state, i say no one was stoned, end of story." >> charlie, whenever i watch ahmadinejad doing interviews, i am reminded of a famous "seinfeld" episode where george costanza asked the secret of lying and george said to jerry "it's not a lie if you believe it" and sometimes i think ahmadinejad is delusional, he believes that iran is the freest country in the world, he believes it has an incredibly prosperous econo
our behavior. when faced with a tough decision we rely on our emotions somewhat to help guide us. last month, we talked about positive emotions such as reward and pleasure. tonight we turn to fear and anxiety. human have evolved to feel fear in response to danger and to exhibit aggression when threatened. today fear and aggression can be found throughout the animal kingdom. by studying these emotions in animals, we may one day learn how to control violent behavior in ourselves. last month we discussed how the brap's pleasure circuits are corrupted by addiction. this evening we will learn how the brain's fear circuits go awry in clinical syndromes of fear such as chronic anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. human anxiety disorders are some of the most common mental illnesss in the country. nearly one-third of all americans will exhibit symptoms of an anxiety disorder at least once during his or her lifetime. post-traumatic stress disorder's also becoming more prevalent. more than 40,000 war veterans are currently affected by this illness with thousands more cases going unreported
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from london, a special edition of "charlie rose." >> charlie: lord peter mandelson is here. he's a member of britain's how was lords, former cabinet minister under prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown, a key architect of the labour campaign that helped his party rise to power in 1997. he served as secretary of state for trade and industry, secretary of state for northern ireland and secretary of state for business. he has now written a book about those years of public service. it is called "the third man, life at the heart of new labour," i am pleased to have peter mandelson back on this program. welcome. >> nice to be back. >> charlie: let me get to some of the controversy first. that tony blair is not happy that your book is coming out as it did, because -- and that somehow it's created a little tension between the two of you. >> no tensio
through literature and you can find out by talking. and you can find out by using your imagination. and for an appelate judge that's important. because when you're in that room, as you are, and writing and reading, what you are goinging to write is going to affect other people. so it's very important to have the imagination to try to understand how your opinions and your decisions will affect the lives of others. >> rose: why are things that you read like literature important to a judge? >> i told a group of undergraduates here in new york a few weeks ago when i was asked that question. and i said it's like knowing a foreign language or reading a novel. we only have one life. and we only really know our own. but by reading novels and by reading what other people have written about life, and about different ways of living, you can lead more lives than your own. and you can understand how people could have lived a quite different life. and that's a wonderful privilege to be able to do that as well as i think a necessity for someone whose's goinging to affect the lives of other people
there on inauguration day. all the media attention. >> rose: 200,000 in germany. >> right. and so it's us. we're going to run the country. and so i don't think they understood the anxiety the country was feeling. i don't think they understood the post excess moment that we were going through and are still going through, of people feelinging that we've-- we've squandered things. we've overspent. we've spoiled ourselves. we haven't behaved responsibly. >> rose: we've lost something that is important to have, some quality that we had that made us as a country who we are. >> right. >> and a turn point which is forgotten. i guess the pastor he name was platt. >> david platt was a pastor at a megachurch and he said megachurches are too commercial, consumer christianity. we have to 3u8 back. and he is not the first to say that but he is part of it this moment where people are redefining what socially acceptable, the billing car, the hummer, that's no longer socially acceptable and it's part of i think a big cultural change, caused by the recession but caused by the sense that we haven't been responsible, tha
difficulties or challenges which might come from the mineral development, this would be the issue for us. >> rose: china and mongolia next. words alone aren't enough. our job is to listen and find ways to help workers who lost their jobs to the spill. i'm iris cross. we'll keep restoring the jobs, tourist beaches, and businesses impacted by the spill. we've paid over $400 million in claims and set up a $20 billion independently-run claims fund. i was born in new orleans. my family still lives here. i'm gonna be here until we make this right. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tung chee hwa is here. he is the chairman of the china united states exchange foundation. it aims to build greater understanding between the world's two largest economies. he is the former chief executive of hong kong, he has a long, close tie with the chinese leadership. he is currently vice chairman of the national committee of the chinese people's political consultant conference, the mainland's top political advisory body. i am very please
for education reform and health care reform. it allows us to move forward and get things done on energy and what we want most is... help our economy to start to thrive and grow and innovate again. >> rose: we conclude this evening with laird hamilton, the extraordinary surfer, and susan casey, the author of a book called "the wave: in pursuit of the rogues, freaks, and giants of the ocean." >> the planet is mostly ocean and life comes from the ocean. and so one of the things i really aim to do with my writing is to take people into these places and show them the incredible majesty and in some cases the fear and in some cases the wackiness. but there's, like, a parallel universe. and it's in our world that we live in. how often do we see it. >> and if you part patriot, then you'll appreciate, then you'll revere. so all of those things i think are so critical in what needs to happen for the ocean. we need these books, we need these waves, we need people to be in awe of them maybe at first, to participate in activities and then ultimately be pro active in trying to protect the ocean. >> rose: melod
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
. mark may have a different opinion about that, but i think that that's probably a bad sign for us. but the other part of that sign, charlie, if i were a democrat, for instance, running for the house or for the senate somewhere else in the country, i'd look at that delaware outcome and i'd say we have one more piece of evidence that the right in this country, the conservative base of voters, is enormously energized. they're going to turn out if large numbers. they turned out last night to defeat a moderate republican. but they're all going to vote in november and they're all going to vote against the democrats. >> rose: mark? >> i agree with that. in the short term the republicans suffer because they've take an sure win and made it a very likely loss and that what's likely necessary to get the ten seats they need to take back the majority. i agree between now and november this is an unaloyed good for the republicans except to the exsent that the democrats suck sneed what they're trying to do which is to define the entire republican party as captive to the tea party. i don't think i
to go nuclear or not, i think the thing that would make them go nuclear is for us to continue to threaten to attack them even with nuclear weapons, either us or the israelis and not communicate with them. so i would communicate with them and stop threatening them. jup we conclude with the new movie about facebook. it's called "president social network, we have the director david fincher and the screen writer aaron sorkin. >> you never want to present a carkner a movie that you don't empathize with. it was not a character assassination. we were... we had a guy who from certain perspectives he was a judas and he had betrayed his friend. obviously that's a specific point of view. >> at the sender is a very modern invention but the story is as old as story telling itself, of friendship and loyalty and betrayal and power and class and things that shakespeare would have written about and it's lucky for me that none of these guys were available so i got to write about it. >> rose: jimmy carter, aaron sorkin and david fincher when we continue. words alone aren't enough. workers who lo
disorders. helen mayberg, her research uses scanning technology to isolate the brain regions involved in clinical depression. she's performed studies that illustrate the positive effects of deep brain stimulatioon depressed patients. once again mine cohost is dr. eric kandel. as you know he is a noble laureate, a professor at columbia university and a howard hughes medical investigator. so i am pleased to sort of begin this conversation in this sense for reasons you will tell us, this is a different episode of our series. >> we're speaking about major psychiatric disorders. as you outlined we're going to custody pression, manic depressive disorder also called bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. we want to understand what we can do about them. these are as you indicated devastating disorders. they affect the way people think and feel and motivation. moreover one of the tragic aspects of these disorders is that they affect people early in their lives just as they're beginning to reach the peak of their productivity, the peak of their ability to enjoy themselves. schizophrenia typically
will do bad things to us over the long run? >> well, look, i hope so. the reason is that without that, we're off to a fiscal crisis. and that's a situation we never want to find ourselves in. now the other benefit that we didn't discuss is if you need additional revenue simply canceling the existing tax cuts after some period of time after? >> after two years. the key thing is that there's a definitive ending period in that there's a commitment very clear up front including a veto threat that you not extend it thereafter. the other benefit of that is all that would do is return the tax code to the form that.... >> charlie: in the clinton years. >> in the 1990s. you can't argue that that will cause economic ka catastrophe. in the highly politicized debate over what happens when revenue changes take effect it's beneficial to be able to point back and say all we're doing is return to go the 1990s. >> charlie: returning means the following. if you today eliminated the tax cuts for people who made more than $250,000, you would gain how much revenue? >> about $250,000? about $35 billion in the
%. give us the lowest corporation tax in the g-7. and that is a huge advert in this program, by the way, it is a good low corporate tax environment. >> rose: that's what ireland did exactly. >> and i think now they were able to take it quite a lot further than 24%. but nevertheless, from we're taking it from 28% to 24%. if you think of many people in my situation, many people sitting in a room like this, in faced with a very high budget deficit we would be very tempted to put up business taxes. but because, precisely because i want to give-- given growth and private sector investment and job creation, that i'm actually going in the other direction and reducing business taxes. >> rose: but the president is making in the united states the exact opposite decision. >> every country has got to make his own decisions. and the american administration has got challenges just like the british government has got. challenges. but actually, if you look at, from what i can gather, the u.s. administration is concerned about infrastructure. we've concerned about infrastructure. we're protecting the ca
us is what we wanted. >> the divergence between what was enacted and what was, you know.... >> charlie: dired desired by the administration. >> look, in any piece of legislation there's always going to be some give and take and some things that were done that were actually... by and large it was in line with what the administration itself had come up with. >> charlie: therefore all those people who want to say the failure of this administration is they let the congress write a stimulus program they didn't like is not true. not true. you've got the stimulus program essentially you wanted. >> yes now the caveat. >> charlie: large because of the political realities. >> the caveat is even in internal workings to come up with the desired proposals, there was some recognition of what was feasible legislatively. in other words, so it wasn't just let's just come up with the perfect ideal optimal thing. it was here is a proposal we could live with that we think could pass. >> charlie: you haven't had a lot of time to think about this i don't think, i doubt. but if you could rewri
and that's going to be enormously difficult. >> rose: in u.s. they are not just cutting fat they are cutting to the muscle. >> they are cutting it back in a big way. >> they have to do two things, make the case for paring back and cutting back in public spending without cuting the roots of future economic growth in this country. therefore, focus on your priorities. don't just take out sort of an axe across the whole waterfront of public spending and investment. make sure that as you make your savings, cut down your expenditure, make your economy, do not axe those things on which our future economic growth depend. >> this new government here will be doing some difficult things. and people will be reminded of the fact that the decision makers-- . >> rose: but are you in favor of them doing difficult things i understand. >> i am favor of them doing difficult things but i think it also alters the way you people look at domestic policy. >> rose: i poke to george osborne about these and other issues today in an interview earlier at his office here in london. >> here is that conver
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)